Tuesday, January 8, 2008

Sometimes Everything Flows


This is one of those games that feels almost effortless, every move just feels natural. I am on the white side of QGD Exchange Variation, and I have the initiative pretty much all game long. Black seems to do nothing but react. After white's 8th move, black is already several tempi behind and white owns the center. After white's 11th move, it looks even worse for black. On move 18 white gets a free pawn since black can't take the bishop without losing his queen. The rest was straightforward and black didn't put up much resistance, getting mated on move 24.

9 comments:

nemo said...

Very well played! Nice to see some games against decent opposition. Keep up the good work!

liquideggproduct said...

The picture's funny!

Black seems to be OK until move 6, when he played e5. I'm not sure what he was hoping to get out of that, and he didn't help himself very much in subsequent moves.

The Kingside pick-apart was beautiful.

Chessaholic said...

nemo - thanks, I'll try my best not to suck too much :)

lep: yeah, I thought the pic was funny and appropriate!

black made my life pretty easy, badly neglecting his development. Note his knight and bishop on b8 and c8 never leave their squares...

Temposchlucker said...

Have a look at this old post of mine

Chessaholic said...

tempo - that's funny... guess you beat me to the punch by some measly two and a half years :)

Anonymous said...

Actually, that wasn't a QGD exchange.

Black has to take with the pawn to make a QGD exchange.

Chessaholic said...

aononymous: I know the move order is unorthodox but it’s a QGD Exchange Variation by transposition, that’s what Fritz says anyways. If you go here and enter the first 5 moves plus white’s sixth, you’ll see that there actually are 626 games in the database with that move order. After black’s sixth move, there are only 6 games in the database with the same move order.

PeteyDaddy said...

Nice game! You owned that guy. He was trading pieces like it was going out of style, and you kept up with him while improving your position at the same time.

Polly said...

Sweet! Classic example of neglecting development for gratitous attacking moves.